Remodelling Jewellery

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Remodelling old or inherited jewellery is a common practice for me. Each piece that comes into the workshop brings with it a different story and a wealth of personal significance.

Typically the jewellery that I’m brought is either broken, worn or simply not to the taste of the current owner. This is where taking the pieces apart and recycling the materials gives new life to the metal and stones. Salvaging and re-using metals and stones continues the family legacy of the piece.

Over the years I’ve worked on large, old cut diamonds sourced in Africa during the 1800s, re-worked inherited engagement rings and even converted a mothers jewellery into a signet ring for her son.

Re-used Diamonds & Aquamarine Cuff

This dramatic gold cuff is made using two fan-shaped aquamarines and a baguette diamond which were removed from a bangle. I combined these with a collection of heirloom oval aquamarines, diamonds and gold recycled from inherited jewellery.

I formed the cuff itself from 18ct yellow gold sheet, designing it to sit comfortably around the wrist. I then added a slim edge wire to give extra visual weight. A bright line of palladium runs though the centre of the cuff in a curved, organic line scattered with the oval and fan cut aquamarines.

Re-modelled Princess Cut Diamonds

There are two matching, 2ct Princess Cut diamonds in this minimal platinum pendant. There were originally housed in a yellow gold brooch that I designed for a client’s wife. The diamonds had been cut from the same crystal, making them a truly perfect, matching pair. After the sad, early passing of the client’s wife he wanted the diamonds to stay together. We remodelled them into a piece of jewellery that his new partner would enjoy:

I spaced the diamonds along the length of this animated pendant. The movement of wearing allows the bright, clear stones to best catch the eye.

Inherited Stones & Gold in Wedding Rings

A very personal project, these two wedding bands were made for the daughter of an old friend of mine. The bride’s engagement ring was dainty while she favoured larger jewellery. Taking this into account I designed a wide, statement ring for it to sit within, slotting neatly into place.

The white gold of the bands is new but the other metals, 22ct and 18ct yellow gold, come from her mother’s jewellery. The rubies, sapphires and diamonds scattered around both of the rings are also inherited and act as a memento of the bride’s late mother. Engraved lines in the groom’s ring echo those of the gold lines on the bridal ring, tying the pair of rings together.

Rubies and Sapphires, Remade into a Pendant

The rubies and sapphires here were salvaged from several rings and a brooch, which the client no longer wore. Their uneven sizes presented a challenge but after some thought I was able to arrange them into a fluid, flowing design:

 The final palladium pendant hangs from an 18ct yellow gold cable which beautifully reflects the warmth of the rubies.

Heirloom Jewellery Converted into a Cuff

This cuff was a labour of love! At the centre of it is a restored 9ct yellow gold bangle, given by the client’s father to her mother on their 50th Wedding Anniversary. I made sure that the original engraving on the inside of the bangle is still visible on the inside of the new cuff.

The hammered golden body of the cuff is 18ct yellow gold and the deeper coloured edge wire is 22ct gold, recycled from several family wedding rings. Through clever setting design the unevenly sized and mixed cut diamonds appear to form a smooth, curving line. The stones graduate in size from the centre of the cuff outwards, adding a bright sparkle to the whole wrist.

Whatever the shape of your unworn jewellery, the metal or stones can be re-designed into brand new pieces that carry deep personal significance. I can re-purpose them into something new to suit your taste, lifestyle and give you a beautifully wearable new heirloom.

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